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Welcome to the Port Jervis Free Library's public access computer center staffed with technology trainers to provide services and instruction to the general public. The center is known as "The Hub,” a technology term that also captures the earlier canal and railroad heritage of the City.
 
 

The focus of the "The Hub” is to advance the use of E-services for training, employment, digital literacy, and education. Whether you are a beginner user or you wish to improve your skills on the computer, the Hub offers one-on-one individual instruction or group classes.  New classes are added each month.  These current topics are sure to be a hit so check out the CALENDAR OF EVENTS AND CLASSES for program details and register today.

The Hours for the Hub are as follows:
Mon & Thurs - 10AM - 7:45PM
Tues, Wed & Fri - 10AM - 5:45PM

Saturday - 10AM to 2:00PM
Sunday - CLOSED

 
 
Contact the Hub staff by calling 845-772-7586 or emailing thehub@portjervislibrary.org.


THE HUB AND BKAA SUCCESSFULLY COLLABORATE
ON A NATURE WALK THROUGH HUCKLEBERRY STATE FOREST

On June 7th, Basha Kill Area Association (BKAA) Outdoor Educator, Mike Medley, led a nature walk co-organized by the BKAA and The Hub (the Public Computer Center at the Port Jervis Free Library).   The walk covered approximately 5 miles of the Lenape Ridge Trail in Huckleberry State Forest.  It is anticipated that these trails will be extended all the way from Port Jervis to the Mohonk Preserve in the near future.

The group departed from the Minisink Avenue Trail head in Port Jervis and hiked along the northwest side of the ridge enjoying many of the panoramic views from the rock outcroppings. The valley farm lands and Port Jervis in the distance with its bridge to Pennsylvania were visible and the flag on Point Peter stood proudly on the top of the mountain rising from the far side of the valley.

Pictured are Leader Mike Medley and some of The Hub Hikers- Dr. Hassan Sadaghiani, Carol Chase and Cindy Coker with Port Jervis and Pennsylvania in the background. (Photo courtesy Fred Harding)

Along the way Mike pointed out several of the abundant varieties of flora interspersed with the white and pink blooms of Mountain Laurel.   A section of dead trees that fell to a fire of 10 years ago protruded slightly above the plentiful new green growth.  Standing out to this participant was also the American chestnut.   Although succumbing to the chestnut blight over a century ago, Chestnut saplings sprout from the roots of those original trees and grow to about 20 feet before also losing to the blight.  Each of these accounts speaks to the remarkable sustainability of the forest.  It overcomes fire, it overcomes blight, and it survives if it is not destroyed by our own hands and deeds.

Although the lively and interesting conversation of this and other adventures of members of the group gave the forest creatures plenty of time to scurry away and hide, evidence of predators existence was provided by a squirrel’s tail and various other clues.  Bird calls were abundant, but we lacked an accomplished birder to identify them other than robins and orioles. In addition to large holes in distressed trees, a black and white feather confirmed the likelihood of pileated woodpeckers.  Another large black feather from a turkey vulture (several of which flew overhead).

The southeastern valley with High Point in the distance-the highest point in the State of New Jersey. (Photo courtesy Fred Harding)

Crossing over the summit, yet another riveting landscape unfolded before us.  While taking in the beauty of the green canopy below us, mother deer with new born fawns scampered through an opening.  Now continuing along the southeasterly side of the ridge, we walked above Heinlein Pond for some distance, while Mike Medley and Fred Harding speculated about the likelihood of large fish in this virtually undisturbed water.

As we crossed back over the summit to return to the trail head, the conversation seemed to subside and the troupe continued along in silence reflecting on the beauty and peace of the forest, the silence interrupted only by a flock of scolding crows serving as a reminder that the forest is alive and it is our job to preserve this environment for the walks of tomorrow by this and future generations.

By Fred Harding,  AKA The Average Fisherman


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